Welcome to Tagawa Gardens
Nursery & Garden Center

Want to work at Tagawa Gardens?

Click Here for our $5 OFF Coupon!*

Take our Survey!

Hours through Sunday, September 2:

Monday-Saturday: 9am-6pm
Sunday: 10am-5pm

Fourth of July: Closed

Labor Day, Monday, September 3: 9am - 5pm


CONTACT US: (click here for e-mail)      

303.690.4722

7711 S. Parker Road Centennial, CO 80016

Tagawa Gardens Nursery & Garden Center

Colorado Trees and Shrubs

  •      
  •      
  •      

     
Planting
Trees

Click for Video
Watering
Trees

Click for Video
Pruning
Trees

Click for Video
Planting
Underappreciated Trees

Click for Video
Growing
Grapes and Berries

Click for Video

Trees and shrubs are the "bones" of any good landscape. They hold  a beautiful garden together and give it structure and a sense of belonging.  Tagawa's take pride in offering the best trees and shrubs for Colorado's Front Range, and the advice that will help them thrive.

Here is our 2017 Tree and Shrub list. This is not a live inventory and for reference only for the types of trees and shrubs we generally carry. Please call our Tree & Shrub Nursery at 303-690-4722 ext 143 to check current availability. 

Shade trees are Tagawa's most popular nursery plant and for good reason. They can make any yard a welcoming oasis in the heat of summer. But our experienced staff brings in a hundreds of other trees and shrubs, too..... woody plants with varying heights when grown, different shapes and colors. Tell us (or take a picture and show us!) where you want a new tree or shrub to grow, and we'll help you make the best choice.

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a hot topic in the Colorado nursery industry since it was discoverd in Boulder in 2013. This devastating insect has killed millions of ash trees in other states. For the latest information from the Colorado Department of Agriculture, please visit EABColorado.com .

CSU has created a great video to help you identify EAB. If you suspect you might have EAB, please contact your local CSU Extension office right away.

In 2012, our arborist, Mike Landers, was invited to create some videos with About.com to help answer the most frequently asked tree and shrub questions. Here are the topics and links (links used with permission):

Best Trees for Your Landscape

Best Flowering Trees

Best Fruit Trees

How to Choose a Tree

Best Shrubs for Privacy

Best Flowering Shrubs

How to Choose a Shrub

How to Stake a Tree

How to Identify a Diseased Tree

What questions do we hear most often?

Question #1: How do I plant a tree or shrub?

Answer: Dig the planting hole AT LEAST two to three times wider than the root ball, and two- to four-inches shallower. The "flare" is where a tree's main roots come out of the trunk. Once the tree is planted, the flare needs to sit two- to four-inches ABOVE the surrounding soil level. Too high is always better than too deep! Planting the flare too deep can damage, and eventually kill a young tree. Shrubs may not have an obvious flare, but should still be planted slightly above the surrounding grade. The soil removed from the hole can be combined with no more than 25% compost and used as back-fill. Place the tree or shrub in the planting hole. Then be sure to REMOVE ANY MATERIAL AROUND THE ROOTBALL, such as wire baskets, burlap or twine. Leaving that restrictive material in place could significantly shorten the life of the tree or shrub. Add the amended soil half way up the side of the root ball, then water it in well. Add the remaining soil and water again. DO NOT COVER THE TOP SURFACE OF THE ROOT BALL WITH FRESH SOIL! The top of the root ball should be visible, as it was in the nursery pot. The water will settle the soil. The planting hole should not be compressed by stepping or standing on it.

Add a two- to three-inch-layer of organic mulch (such as wood chips or shredded bark) around the tree or shrub. The mulch should be kept a few inches away from the base of the trunk.

Question #2: How often should I water a tree?

Answer: This is tricky one. No single answer will fit all situations. Factors such as soil type and drainage, weather, time of year and plant species will affect how much water a tree needs, and how often.

Here's a good rule of thumb: Water the plant, let it soak in, then gently dig down about six inches, just outside the outer edge of the root ball. Retrieve some soil, compress it in your hand and see if it's moist enough to hold together. If it is, your tree has enough water. If the clump of soil falls apart, add more water until the entire root ball is wet, but not soggy.

Too much water on young trees and shrubs is one of the most common problems we see in the landscape. Plant roots need tiny pockets of air as much as they need adequate water. When over-watering drives out the air, roots will rot. Water your plants deeply, as described above, then let them dry out until the top several inches of soil is dry to the touch, before watering again. Deep, but infrequent watering, is the key.

Question #3: When is the best time to plant a tree or shrub?
Answer: The ideal time to plant a tree or shrub is early spring, before the plant has leafed out. But here in Colorado, plants grown in containers (as opposed to bare root plants, without soil), can be planted anytime the ground is workable. Planting in the heat of summer will require a bit more T.L.C., but it can definitely be done successfully.


Welcome to Tagawa Gardens
Nursery & Garden Center

Want to work at Tagawa Gardens?

Click Here for our $5 OFF Coupon!*

Take our Survey!

Hours through Sunday, September 2:

Monday-Saturday: 9am-6pm
Sunday: 10am-5pm

Fourth of July: Closed

Labor Day, Monday, September 3: 9am - 5pm


CONTACT US: (click here for e-mail)      

303.690.4722

7711 S. Parker Road Centennial, CO 80016

Follow us on Instagram Follow our Blog Join Tagawa on Facebook Watch Tagawa YouTube Video Follow us on Instagram Follow our Blog Join Tagawa on Facebook Watch Tagawa YouTube Video Follow our Blog Follow our Blog Follow us on Instagram Follow our Blog Join Tagawa on Facebook Watch Tagawa YouTube Video